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Nimoy and Spock: Reflections and Farewells, by Mary Anne Mohanraj, Keguro Macharia, Octavia Cade, Iona Sharma, Tim Phipps, Fabio Fernandes, and Erin Horáková (3/2/15)
Article.
Staff, contributors and friends of Strange Horizons offer their thoughts.
Old Books Made New: Four Book Reviews, by Mary Anne Mohanraj, James Palmer, Greg Beatty, and Sean Melican (6/7/04)
Review.
Four short reviews of James White's General Practice, Robert Holstock's Mythago Wood, Lord Dunsany's The Pleasures of a Futuroscope, and Gene Wolfe's Latro in the Mist.
Changing of the Guard, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (9/22/03)
Editorial.
We've had a great third year, and we've got lots of exciting stuff planned for the upcoming year.
The 2002 Tiptree: An Inside Look at a Juried Award, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (4/7/03)
Article.
I'm going to tell you a little bit about the Tiptree Award, about what we were looking for as we read stories and novels, about the selection process, and about how I, personally, made my recommendations, helped select a winner, and helped create the annotated primary list, plus a secondary list of recommended titles.
Journals and Communities, by Mary Anne Mohanraj and Jed Hartman (3/31/03)
Editorial.
Online forums of various sorts, and particularly online journals, have provided a fertile ground for community-building in the speculative fiction world. Here at Strange Horizons, we're big proponents of community-building, so we're pleased to see this process at work.
A New Year, a New Look, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (1/6/03)
Editorial.
Welcome to 2003—you may have noticed that we've made a change here. We've reorganized our Table of Contents page. . . .
The Strange Horizons Summer Workshops, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (10/7/02)
Editorial.
Why a Strange Horizons workshop? Aren't our writers already fabulous? Well, yes—obviously, we think so. But that doesn't mean they can't get better. We'd like our writers to just get better and better and better. And there aren't a whole lot of tools out there to help them do that.
WorldCon 2002: A Pre-Con Report, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (8/26/02)
Editorial.
I thought I'd give you a little tour of my upcoming WorldCon—in the process, though it may seem overwhelming and exhausting, I hope you can also see a little of how fun, diverse, and wonderfully interesting the speculative fiction world can be.
On Trying to Be the Best (and Asking for Money, Too), by Mary Anne Mohanraj (6/3/02)
Editorial.
Awards serve to motivate us, to show us what we've done, and to remind us that no matter how well we're doing, we can always get better. Please help us get better; help us become the best!
Power Dynamics in the Novels of Tananarive Due, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (5/20/02)
Article.
The protagonist of both works, Jessica Wolde, is an ambitious black journalist, married to David, a dream of a husband, whom a friend refers to as Mr. Perfect. Before long, though, it becomes clear that he isn't so perfect—people keep dying around him.
Interview: John M. Ford, by Mary Anne Mohanraj and Fred Bush (4/29/02)
Article.
"SF/F is very often about The Event—getting the space colony built, defeating the Dark Overlord; the characters are there to help or impede that effort, and to tell us what we're supposed to think about it. I want to come at it from the characters' angle, and trust the reader to decide what the moral implications are."
Fall 2001 Reader Survey Results, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (3/4/02)
Editorial.
We thought you might be curious to hear some of the results; I've gone through the raw data and below are some rough summaries of how the survey turned out.
Firebird: A New Line of Young Adult Speculative Fiction, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (2/4/02)
Review.
Firebird is an ambitious project, mixing classic reprints with new titles. In Spring 2002, Firebird is launching with four titles: Westmark, I Am Mordred, Fire Bringer, and The Eye, the Ear, and the Arm.
Avoiding the Potholes: Adventures in Genre-Crossing, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (7/2/01)
Editorial.
There are always books that break out of those statistical bounds, of course, books that are many times as successful as they were supposed to be—and when this happens, the burning question on the publisher's/agent's/author's mind is, what happened? And more importantly, can I make it happen again?
Interview: Tad Williams, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (5/14/01)
Article.
"[O]ne of the things I hope will be fun about Shadowmarch will be the message board on the site, and people expressing opinions. If the readers overwhelmingly want to have more of a particular character (or less) it will very possibly influence what I do."
Online Magazines and Speculative Fiction: Implications for Publishers, Writers, and Readers, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (4/2/01)
Editorial.
We're in a very experimental phase at the moment, but I predict that we're actually going to see some fine magazines shake out of this, and that they'll have very different approaches and tones from the traditional print magazines.
Fearful Desire: Jonathan Carroll's The Marriage of Sticks, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (3/5/01)
Review.
If you buy books for their magic, then I assure you that Carroll will give you plenty of it—both fantasy-type magic, and the magic of an elegant style, an unpredictable, gripping storyline, and compelling characters who make you think.
Interview: Pamela Dean, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (1/1/01)
Article.
"My first attempt at writing occurred when I was about eight, and my consuming desires at that point were to be either a nurse or an astronomer."
So You Want To Start a Magazine, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (1/1/01)
Editorial.
Since Strange Horizons launched in September the questions I've gotten most often are: How do you do it? How do you plan to make this work? Where does your money come from? Can I do it too?
From Tapestry to Mosaic: The Fantasy Novels of Guy Gavriel Kay, by Christopher Cobb and Mary Anne Mohanraj (11/13/00)
Article.
Guy Gavriel Kay, one of the major fantasy authors of our time, has achieved a rare combination of popular and critical acclaim . . . Kay's eight novels ask to be understood in relation to one another, as parts of a much larger imaginative project. . . .
'We must learn to bend, or we break': The Art of Living in Guy Gavriel Kay's Sarantine Mosaic, by Christopher Cobb and Mary Anne Mohanraj (11/13/00)
Review.
All the interest of plot, character, culture, and moral theme that Kay creates for the reader of the Mosaic come together as beautifully as they do because Kay creates it all with an unwearying spirit of love for the spectacle of the world that he records.
Interview: Cecilia Tan, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (10/23/00)
Article.
"I think the erotic science fiction I wrote was defining for me, because it was the final step in solidifying who I was as an adult individual, asserting my sexuality and uncovering a lot of what had just been sublimated up until then. Once that was uncorked, I found my voice, and I've been going strong ever since."
Interview: Nalo Hopkinson, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (9/1/00)
Article.
"I was born in Jamaica, lived in Jamaica, Trinidad, Guyana and the U.S., then moved to Canada in 1977 when I was sixteen . . . I guess I have a sense of many places, not of one. It's given me a sense that all places are unique, so when I write, I try to convey a strong sense of the location in which my story is set."
Strange New Horizons, by Mary Anne Mohanraj (9/1/00)
Editorial.
Speculative fiction (which for me encompasses everything from hard sf to vampire stories to magical realism) has been important to me. It's important to the world. These stories make us think. They critique society. They offer alternatives. They give us a vision of the future—and warn us of the potential dangers therein. They help us understand our past. They are full of beauty, and terror, and delight.