Search the Strange Horizons Archives

Search

for pieces titled or by

Sort my results
    Optional:
Restrict my search by category:



Displaying 13 results:

Kip, Running, by Genevieve Williams (3/10/08)
Fiction.
Almost as one, the runners leap from the shelter roof. When the maglev leaves the station, they'll be on top of it, heading for the labyrinthine transfer station beneath the eye of the ancient, decaying Space Needle.
Reviews for the week of 10/1/07
Review.
Monday: Trust Me, I'm A Fabulator: Three Books reviewed by Dan Hartland
Wednesday: Two Views: Kelley Armstrong's No Humans Involved, reviewed by Genevieve Williams and Colin Harvey
Friday: Harry Turtledove's In At The Death, reviewed by Nader Elhefnawy
Reviews for the week of 6/18/07
Review.
Monday: Patrick Rothfuss' The Name of the Wind, reviewed by Hannah Strom-Martin
Tuesday: Fran´┐Żois Devenne's Three Dreams on Mount Meru, reviewed by Finn Dempster
Wednesday: Joe Abercrombie's Before They Are Hanged, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Steven Brust's Dzur, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Reviews for the week of 9/25/06
Review.
Monday: David Moles and Susan Marie Groppi's Twenty Epics, reviewed by Rose Fox
Tuesday: Frank Schatzing's The Swarm, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Mark Chadbourn's Jack of Ravens, reviewed by Donna Royston
Thursday: Lisa Tuttle's The Silver Bough, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Reviews for the week of 6/26/06
Review.
Monday: Scott Lynch's The Lies of Locke Lamora, reviewed by C.M. Morrison
Tuesday: Robert Freeman Wexler's Circus of the Grand Design, reviewed by Niall Harrison
Wednesday: Kim Wilkins's Giants of the Frost, reviewed by Siobhan Carroll
Thursday: Nisi Shawl and Cynthia Ward's Writing The Other: A Practical Approach, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Reviews for the week of 5/1/06
Review.
Monday: Allen Steele's Coyote Trilogy, reviewed by Justin Howe
Tuesday: Alexandre Aja's The Hills Have Eyes, reviewed by Jonathan McCalmont
Wednesday: Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu's Zahrah the Windseeker, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Thursday: Liz Williams's Darkland, reviewed by Colin Harvey
Reviews for the week of 1/2/06
Review.
Monday: 2005 In Review, by Our Reviewers
Tuesday: Fiona Avery's The Crown Rose, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Wednesday: Gardner Dozois's Galileo's Children, reviewed by Tim Gebhart
Thursday: Of Mice and Gender: The best-laid plans of Battlestar Galactica, by Dan Hartland
Reviews for the week of 10/31/05
Review.
Monday: Wallace and Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, reviewed by Graham Sleight
Tuesday: Charles Coleman Finlay's The Prodigal Troll, reviewed by Genevieve Williams
Wednesday: Richard Bowes's From The Files of the Time Rangers, reviewed by Mark Rich
Thursday: Fantasy Magazine #1, reviewed by Pam McNew
Ensnared by Faith: Katharine Kerr's Snare, by Genevieve Williams (3/22/04)
Review.
What is the future of religion?
Medieval Romance: Michael Tanner and Ellen Maidman's Days Dark as Night, by Genevieve Williams (11/3/03)
Review.
Set in the fictional country of Adama, an island located somewhere off the northern coast of Europe, Days Dark as Night is the tale of the native inhabitants' revolt against an oppressive occupation from the mainland.
Magic, Hellfire, and Chemistry: Lisa Goldstein's The Alchemist's Door, by Genevieve Williams (7/28/03)
Review.
The Alchemist's Door is an intriguing look into the occult world of the Renaissance—a period when alchemy teetered on the brink of true chemistry as proto-scientists searched for the Philosopher's Stone.
Market Trackers and High-End Hackers: William Gibson's Pattern Recognition, by Genevieve Williams (4/21/03)
Review.
Gibson's daring here is his willingness to use a national tragedy as a backdrop while that event is still fresh in the minds of those who experienced it. The effort could have fallen on its face in so many ways; instead, Gibson has produced a profoundly moving novel.}}
Kelley Eskridge's Solitaire: An Absorbing Inquiry into the Nature of Self, by Genevieve Williams (11/4/02)
Review.
[Eskridge's] ability to take her readers on a spiral path to the innermost depths of an individual mind, and then back out again, make this a fascinating read.