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Time for a new blog feature! As you are no doubt aware if you are reading this, Strange Horizons has in its twelve years published an inordinate number of cool and talented writers. So it seemed like it might be fun to check in on what some of them are doing. The plan is that once a month I'm going to put up a post like this, linking to new projects and publications by SH contributors (and for good measure, SH staff as well, in a separate section at the end of the post). If you are a past contributor, you can email me about your news, or about our contributors' mailing list, where I'm going to send out a call for news each month. If you're a regular reader, you're bound to find something interesting in this lot ...

The idea, I should say, was inspired by a Twitter chat with M. C. A. Hogarth, author of several stories for us (included in this collection, with a foreword by Susan Marie Groppi), who mentioned that she has started releasing audiobooks of her stories, which you can investigate here.

Several contributors have been anthologised or otherwise reprinted this month. Francesca Forrest's 2011 SH story, "The Yew's Embrace", is the featured story in this week's Podcastle. Neile Graham has two poems reprinted in Imaginarium 2012: The Best of Canadian Speculative Writing, edited by Sandra Kasturi and Halli Veilegas for ChiZine -- and Claire Humphrey has her SH story "Bleaker Collegiate Presents an All-Female Production of Waiting for Godot" in there as well. Orrin Grey's story "Black Hill" is in The Book of Cthulhu 2, edited by Ross Lockhart for Night Shade.

Others have new material out! Ellen Klages has a new story in Jonathan Strahan's YA anthology Under My Hat. That's technically an August book, but I'll let it slide this time, since Ellen describes it as possibly the best thing she's ever written. Alex Dally MacFarlane's "The 17th Contest of Body Artistry" is in the latest Expanded Horizons (and Alex is still looking for submissions for her reprint anthology Aliens: Recent Encounters until October 15th). K. Tempest Bradford's "The Birth of Pegasus" and Jennifer Pelland's "Sacrifice" can be found in Dark Faith: Invocations, edited by Maurice Broaddus and Jerry Gordon for Apex. A. C. Wise's new story "The Book of Little Deaths" is in the latest Jabberwocky, while Jennifer Marie Brisset's eco-sf "Secrets of the Sea" is in the latest issue of The Future Fire, and Alexandra Seidel's "A Lie Written in Scarlet" is in Scheherazade's Bequest 16. On the poetry front, Bruce Boston's "The Surreal Staircase" is in New Myths 20, and Ann K. Schwader's "Finale, Act Two" appears in A Season in Carcosa, edited. by Joseph S. Pulver Sr for Miskatonic River Press (with a trailer). And Peg Duthie had her micropoem "Yom Kippur" appear in Joanne Merriam's 'zine 7x20. Elizabeth Barrette's Poetry Fishbowl in September was on "rights and responsibilities"; the next Fishbowl will be on Tuesday, with the theme "horror: demons."

Here's a couple of essays. Carmen Machado, author of the forthcoming story "Inventory", has a piece at The Rumpus: "The Last Poem I Loved: "Y" by Andrew Grace. A number of SH contributors have reviews at the LA Review of Books: Paul Kincaid's widely-discussed "The Widening Gyre" I've already mentioned, but Michael Levy looks at Kathleen Ann Goonan's new collection Angels and You Dogs, while Erin Horakova wrestles with Kij Johnson's At the Mouth of the River of Bees. Meanwhile, Genevieve Valentine has some Things You Should Know about Revolution, Dredd, and Elementary.

There are a number of new books, as well. Graham Sleight's The Doctor's Monsters: Meanings of the Monstrous in Doctor Who is out from IB Taurus, which is good news for anyone who enjoyed his reviews for us of the early seasons of the reboot. Anil Menon and Vandana Singh's anthology Breaking the Bow: Speculative Fiction inspired by the Ramayana is available from Zubaan Books, and is probably SH-related anthology of the month, since it also features past contributors Indrapramit Das, Shweta Narayan, Lavie Tidhar, Tori Truslow, Aishwarya Subramanian -- and SH founder Mary Anne Mohanraj. David Kopaska-Merkel has edited On the Brink of Never, an anthology of apocalyptic poetry for Sam's Dot Publishing. Marie Brennan's new novel Lies and Prophecy has been released by Book View Cafe. Roz Kaveney's first novel Rituals has been published by Plus One Press (and is getting some great reviews). Jamieson Riddenhour's 2011 novel Barking Mad is just out as an ebook. F. J. Bergmann's fairy-tale poem chapbook Out of the Black Forest is available from Centennial Press, illustrated by Kelli Hoppman; and Faith L. Justice published a collection of five stories, plus an interview with Ursula L. Guin: details here. And finally a glimpse of forthcoming work: Phoebe North's debut YA sf novel Starglass is out next summer from Simon & Schuster, and the cover has been revealed on the Booksmugglers blog.

Since Phoebe is one of our articles editors, that segues us neatly into the staff news for September. Fiction Editor Julia Rios hosts the latest Outer Alliance podcast, a fascinating discussion on "Changing the Conversation" recorded at Worldcon, with Nnedi Okorafor, Jim Hines, and Sofia Samatar (who talks a little about her forthcoming story in SH, "Selkie Stories are for Losers"). Poetry Editor Sonya Taaffe has a new poem of her own in Through the Gate: "Spirit Photography". Senior Reviews Editor Abigail Nussbaum has tackled Michael Chabon's Telegraph Avenue and Hilary Mantel's Bring Up the Bodies at Asking the Wrong Questions (also, a Worldcon report). And at Tor.com, Senior Fiction Editor Brit Mandelo has thoughts on Malinda Lo's Adaptation, and on Richard Powers' Galatea 2.2 and the process of criticism.

Phew! Same time next month?



Niall Harrison is a reader and fan.
3 comments on “Stranger Horizons, September 2012”
John Schoffstall

A great and fun idea! Thanks for doing this.

Glad you enjoyed it! It was fun to put together.

Ah! Thanks for the shout-out there. I am tickled! 😀 Also, what an awesome list of new things to check out! *gets busy looking at links*

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