Size / / /

Content warning:



Leary, Georgia. 1969.

The shape was bright white
like the moon. The moon whose face
                that year had been trampled
                by bouncing white men.

No flight was recorded that night
                though the night
                was clear.
It should have been easy
to count the moving vessels in the sky.

Jimmy Carter noted the object was not solid
                but self-luminous
like lightning or a mirage.
It hovered
and changed from blue
                to red to white again,
leapt away as quickly as it came;
                dismissed
                as quickly as believed.

                The people in that Georgia Lions Club
                began to draw the shape
                but none of them could
remember the shape.
                A scientist thought maybe
                                it was sunlight scattering
                sodium and barium in the atmosphere.
Possible. We were drawing the possibilities
but none of us
                could remember the shape
of possibility:
                not solid
                but self-luminous

                                like lightning or a mirage.



August Huerta is a poet from Austin, Texas. They are a recent graduate of The New Writers Project at the University of Texas at Austin. They are a 2019 Rhysling nominee and will be featured in a forthcoming episode of poetry podcast This is Just to Say.
Current Issue
27 Jun 2022

A crack in my leg opened my world, shattered it like thunder announces the arrival of lightning
it's only natural that // If I'm going, I want to be gone with you.
[In this interview, Strange Horizons co-ordinating editor Gautam Bhatia speaks to Dip Ghosh, the editor of Kalpabiswa, the first online magazine of Bengali SFF. This interview was conducted through a collaborative Google Document, in June 2022.] Gautam Bhatia: Hi Dip, and thanks so much for agreeing to do this interview with Strange Horizons. I want to start by asking you something basic: the name of the Bengali SF magazine you edit is Kalpabiswa. Bengali SF itself is known as kalpavigyan. Can you
There are plenty of reasons to love epistolary storytelling. Personally, I love the way various epistolary formats can shape a story in interesting and innovative ways, and I also love how the choice of format can hone the voice of a story.
Issue 20 Jun 2022
Issue 13 Jun 2022
Issue 9 Jun 2022
Drowning in This Sunken City 
Thursday: Everything Everywhere All At Once 
,
Issue 6 Jun 2022
Podcast: 6 June Poetry 
Issue 30 May 2022
Issue 23 May 2022
Issue 16 May 2022
Issue 9 May 2022
Podcast: 9 May Poetry 
Issue 2 May 2022
By: Eric Wang
By: Sara S. Messenger
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Podcast read by: Sara S. Messenger
Issue 18 Apr 2022
By: Blaize Kelly Strothers
By: Ken Haponek
Podcast read by: Blaize Kelly Strothers
Podcast read by: Ken Haponek
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Load More
%d bloggers like this: