Size / / /

From ships sent to study our planet,

they listen to waves vibrating our air,

the cacophony of drills, screams, desperate calls,

which they tune out with flicks of dials

to zero in on rhythmic stuttering

and swelling crescendos of low and high tones.

Notes are recorded, a slow dissection of the human heart,

something there which humans cannot fully articulate,

how resilient, yet how vulnerable, they have evolved.

These recordings, drained of humanity and all imperfection,

are then beamed back in the seething swirl of dissonance,

where few notice, except at odd moments

inside stores or elevators, when some dark chill

overtakes their hearts, glimmers of the unknown,

when just for an instant they detect the presence

of some cold intelligence devoid of empathy,

and sense menace, that we all may die.




Thomas D. Reynolds received an MFA in creative writing from Wichita State University, currently teaches at Johnson County Community College, and has published poems in various print and online journals, including New Delta Review, Alabama Literary Review, Aethlon: The Journal of Sport Literature, American Western Magazine, Combat, The MacGuffin, and Midwest Poetry Review. His poem "How to Survive On a Distant Planet," previously published in Strange Horizons, was nominated for a Rhysling Award in the short poem category. You can send Thomas email at tomrey8@yahoo.com.
Current Issue
28 Nov 2022

The comb is kept in a small case and a magnifying glass is there for you
Know that the end / is something that you cannot escape here.
I wanted to ask francophone African speculative authors how they feel, how non-Black francophone African authors relate to the controversy, but also how they position themselves either as Afrofuturists or Africanfuturists, or as neither.
The new idea is to have the sixth sensors oversee the end of humanity.
By: RiverFlow
Translated by: Emily Jin
In conclusion, I argue that SF fanzines in China mostly played a transitional role. That is, when no professional platforms were available to publish articles and stories, fanzines stepped in. Though most of those fanzines did not last very long, they played the important role of compiling and delivering information. The key reason why I identify those magazines as fanzines is because all the contributors joined out of their interest in SF and worked for free.
Issue 21 Nov 2022
Issue 14 Nov 2022
Issue 7 Nov 2022
Issue 31 Oct 2022
Issue 17 Oct 2022
Issue 10 Oct 2022
Issue 3 Oct 2022
Issue 26 Sep 2022
Issue 21 Sep 2022
Issue 12 Sep 2022
Load More
%d bloggers like this: