Size / / /

Strange Horizons is delighted to present our Brazilian special issue: five new stories and three poems by fantasy and science fiction authors from Brazil and its diaspora.

The year of 2019 was difficult for the entire planet, and Brazil especially so. We have seen political persecution, the rise of far right, and political chaos. The Amazon is still burning, but artists keep creating in spite of it.

When I began following the short fiction market in 2016, it was rare to find published Latin American writers, let alone South Americans and Brazilians. Our own scene was restricted: we had Trasgo as the only paid magazine, self-published stories on Amazon.com, and a couple of anthologies here and there. Now the market is flourishing with new magazines and ideas, as Jana Bianchi covers in her state of play article.

Our presence in international magazines is still scarce. According to my own research, only four Brazilians were present in English-speaking SFF magazines in 2019 so far. We are happy to expand this number a little bit, with new fiction by Isa Prospero, Heitor Zen, Sérgio Motta, H. Pueyo, and Kali de los Santos, and poetry by Jarid Arraes and Woody Dismukes. The fiction podcasts of these stories were read by Solaine Chioro, Julia Quandt, Sérgio Motta, and Anaea Lay, and the stunning artwork was done by Juliana Pinho.

We hope you are as passionate about this issue as we are, and that it can help open the door for other Brazilians and Latin Americans to publish their work worldwide.



Dante Luiz is an illustrator, art director for Strange Horizons, and occasional writer from southern Brazil. He is the interior artist for Crema (comiXology/Dark Horse), and his work with comics has also appeared in anthologies, like Wayward Kindred, Mañana, and Shout Out, among others. Find him on Twitter or his website.
Current Issue
26 Sep 2022

Would a Teixcalaanli aristocrat look up at the sky, think of Lsel Station, and wonder—with Auden—"what doubtful act allows/ Our freedom in this English house/ our picnics in the sun"?
I propose that The Expanse and its ilk present us with a similar sentiment, in reverse—a warning that for all the promise of futurism and technological advancement, plenty of new, and perhaps much worse futures are right before us. In the course of outrunning la vieux monde, we may find that we are awaited not simply by new worlds to win, but also many more which may yet be lost.
where oil slurped up out of the dirt, they drink the coffee
Science fiction is a genre that continues to struggle with its own colonialist history, of which many of its portrayals of extractivism are a part. Science fiction is also a genre that has a history of being socially progressive and conscious – these are both truths.
Bring my stones, my bones, back to me
If we are to accept that the extractive unconscious is latent, is everywhere, part of everything, but unseen and unspoken, and killing us in our waking lives, then science fiction constitutes its dreams.
they are quoting Darwish at the picket & i am finally breathing again
Waste is profoundly shaping and changing our society and our way of living. Our daily mundane world always treats waste as a hidden structure, together with its whole ecosystem, and places it beyond our sight, to maintain the glories of contemporary life. But unfortunately, some are advantaged by this, while others suffer.
Like this woman, I am carrying the world on my back.
So we’re talking about a violence that supplants the histories of people and things, scrubbing them clean so that they can fuel the oppressive and unequal status quo it sustains.
Friday: Leech by Hiron Ennes 
Issue 21 Sep 2022
Issue 12 Sep 2022
Issue 5 Sep 2022
Issue 29 Aug 2022
By: Cat T.
Issue 22 Aug 2022
Issue 15 Aug 2022
Issue 8 Aug 2022
Issue 1 Aug 2022
Issue 18 Jul 2022
Issue 11 Jul 2022
Load More
%d bloggers like this: