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Direct link: January poetry (MP3)

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the January issues.

  • “Scythia" by Marinelle G. Ringer, read by Marinelle G. Ringer. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Marinelle here.
  • “Orthography in the Lands of Yahm" by Daniel Ausema, read by Daniel Ausema. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Daniel here.
  • “Retirement" by Samantha Renda-Dollman, read by Julia Rios. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Samantha here.
  • “Meatspace" by David C. Kopaska-Merkel, read by Ciro Faienza. You can read the full text of the poem and more about David here.



Ciro Faienza (pronounced CHEE-roh) is an American/Italian national currently residing in Pescara, Italy. He has acted on stages and screens throughout Texas and Massachusetts, and his work as a filmmaker has shown at the Dallas Museum of Art, the Dallas Hub Theater, and the National Gallery, London. His fiction is featured in numerous publications, including Daily Science Fiction and Futuristica, Vol 1. His short story "J'ae's Solution" was a top finalist in PRI's 3-Minute Futures Contest. During the day he teaches English and American business culture. Find him at his Facebook author page and on @cirofaienza.
Daniel Ausema is a writer and poet from Colorado. His poetry has previously appeared in Strange Horizons, and his fiction has appeared in many publications. He is also the creator of the steampunk-fantasy serial fiction project Spire City. He has a background in experiential education and is a stay-at-home dad.
An aether compactor by trade, David Kopaska-Merkel began writing poetry after witnessing the Ascension of Tim. He won the Rhysling award for best long poem in 2006 for a collaboration with Kendall Evans. He has written 23 books, of which the latest is SETI Hits Paydirt  (Popcorn Press). Kopaska-Merkel has edited Dreams & Nightmares magazine since 1986.  You can reach him via email.
Julia Rios is a queer, Latinx writer, editor, podcaster, and narrator whose writing has appeared in Latin American Literature Today, Lightspeed, and Goblin Fruit, among other places. Formerly a fiction editor for Strange Horizons, their editing work has won multiple awards, including the Hugo Award. Julia is a co-host of This is Why We're Like This, a podcast about how the movies we watch in childhood shape our lives, for better or for worse. They've narrated stories for Escape Pod, Podcastle, Pseudopod, and Cast of Wonders. Find them on Twitter as @omgjulia.
M. G. Ringer has published poems in The Ontario Review, Cimarron Review, Mudfish, The Hudson Review, and Visions International: The World Journal of Illustrated Poetry, among others.  Ringer's fiction has appeared in First Intensity, Phoenix, and The Midland Review.  Non-fiction publications have concerned everything from American English (International Journal of the Humanities) to Ezra Pound's Cantos (Paideuma).  Ringer has been invited to perform poetry at a number of venues—including the Cornelia Street Cafe in Greenwich Village, New York City, and AS220 in Providence, Rhode Island—as well as deliver scholarly findings at several symposia of the Jack London Society, the American and Popular Culture Associations, the Second International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities, and the Oxford Round Table.
Samantha Renda-Dollman lives in South Africa with her husband, two rabbits and two cats. When not writing poetry or shopping for euro boardgames, she's usually doing something entomological. Or watching crusty old sci-fi movies.
Current Issue
24 Jan 2022

Piece of my essence, accept my sorry.
Some people, right? We’ll fold you into sparrows, help you disappear—I’m so glad we found you alive
By: Katy Bond
By: Averi Kurth
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Podcast read by: Katy Bond
In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Ciro Faienza presents the poetry of the 24 January issue.
Hope without action behind it is only a recipe for deeper heartache.
I love flash fiction for a lot of reasons. There’s the instant gratification of reading a complete work of fiction in just a few minutes. And there’s the way flash lends itself to playful, inventive experimentation with form, prose, style, voice, and subject. I also love the way a flash story can be honed and sharpened as everything extraneous is eliminated, and the way it can capture and convey the essence of something—an emotion, a world, a situation, a possibility, an idea, even a joke!—in brilliant brevity.
Wednesday: I am the Tiger by John Ajvide Lindqvist, translated by Marlaine Delargy 
Friday: The Tangleroot Palace Stories by Marjorie Liu 
Issue 17 Jan 2022
Issue 10 Jan 2022
Issue 3 Jan 2022
Strange Horizons
By: Antonio Funches
By: Lev Mirov
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Issue 20 Dec 2021
By: Merie Kirby
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Issue 13 Dec 2021
By: Freydís Moon
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Issue 6 Dec 2021
By: C. S. E. Cooney
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Podcast read by: C. S. E. Cooney
Issue 29 Nov 2021
Issue 22 Nov 2021
Issue 15 Nov 2021
By: Madeline Grigg
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Issue 8 Nov 2021
By: Allison Parrish
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
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