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Welcome to the Strange Horizons 2018 winter special! This issue is written by and about transgender and nonbinary members of the speculative fiction community.

We have always been here.

Trans and enby people have always existed, because it is a human state of being, and we have always had speculative dreams. We may be more visible now, to circles through which we'd passed unnoticed. We may be more vocal now, our backs to one another, our faces outward, lips in a line. We may be using new words or new pronouns, sharing hashtags and walking through gateways with gatekeeper keys, but we have always, always been here. This is an #ownvoices space, where trans and nonbinary people exist, not as a plot twist or an exotic flavor, but as people building worlds out of words.

Today, we have two stories for you: “Obscura,” by Yoon Ha Lee, and “A Snow, A Food, A Fire,” by Jamie Berrout. Both of them relate to the power of a gaze, what is seen and unseen. There are three poems: the riddle “Woodwork,” the poignant “burying ghosts,” and the stunningly beautiful “Dead Names.” The first of our three reviews is for the trans-centering anthology, Meanwhile, Elsewhere. We also have a trans/nonbinary roundtable, “Beyond 101,” with art by Alex Dingley.

Our resistance column premiers in this issue. This column was made possible by your generous support during the 2017 fund drive. Thank you! Our first piece is by the poet, teacher, and community organizer Ching-In Chen. They focus on speculative poetry and the role of indirect and unformed space as a vehicle of resistance.

For those who haven’t visited the site in a while, we have begun using content warnings. You may see “transphobia” or “dysphoria” associated with content in this issue. Please be aware that this is not a pejorative against the content itself, nor is it labeling the writers transphobic or dysphoric. It’s just a notice for those of us with personal trauma that the topics are covered.

A hearty welcome from the Strange Horizons editor composite! Enjoy the read.



Ness is a queer Baltimorean with a gaming habit and a fondness for green things. Work hats include developmental editing, calligraphy, writing, learning design, and community management (that history degree was extremely useful). Ve started as an articles editor at Strange Horizons in 2012, and is constantly surprised about the number of fencers on the team.
Current Issue
28 Nov 2022

The comb is kept in a small case and a magnifying glass is there for you
Know that the end / is something that you cannot escape here.
I wanted to ask francophone African speculative authors how they feel, how non-Black francophone African authors relate to the controversy, but also how they position themselves either as Afrofuturists or Africanfuturists, or as neither.
The new idea is to have the sixth sensors oversee the end of humanity.
By: RiverFlow
Translated by: Emily Jin
In conclusion, I argue that SF fanzines in China mostly played a transitional role. That is, when no professional platforms were available to publish articles and stories, fanzines stepped in. Though most of those fanzines did not last very long, they played the important role of compiling and delivering information. The key reason why I identify those magazines as fanzines is because all the contributors joined out of their interest in SF and worked for free.
Wednesday: The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2022 edited by Rebecca Roanhorse 
Friday: The Final Strife by Saara El-Arifi 
Issue 21 Nov 2022
Issue 14 Nov 2022
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Issue 31 Oct 2022
Issue 17 Oct 2022
Issue 10 Oct 2022
Issue 3 Oct 2022
Issue 26 Sep 2022
Issue 21 Sep 2022
Issue 12 Sep 2022
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