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Meera is an engineer, former professor of physics, and mom.  This is her first foray into speculative poetry.  Her most recent literary pieces appeared in Rattle (poetry) and on the Wigleaf 50 (prose).
Rushda Rafeek serves as a Fiction Editor for The Missing Slate magazine.  Her works have appeared / are forthcoming in Yellow Chair Review, Visual Verse, Through the Gate, and Noble/Gas Quarterly, among others.  She is currently based in Sri Lanka.
Duke Kimball likes to wear hats.  He has been a mediocre scholar of religion, a Hawaiian shirt enthusiast, and a sleazy used car salesman.  He currently sells spare parts for X-Ray machines and drinks altogether too much coffee.  Duke and his wife Michelle live in Lansing, MI.  He keeps a website at dukekimball.com.
Jungmin Kim has been navigating borderlands since before she was born and has never been allowed to stop.  She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English at Cornell University; her thesis examines intersections of race, gender, and property in American literature.  Both her academic and creative writing explore the power of narratives to make, un-make, and re-make barriers and bridges between nations, diaspora communities, family generations, and individual souls.
Maddie Phelps is an English and Strategic Communication student at the University of Minnesota.  After Maddie graduates this spring, they hope to use their experience in non-profit development and communications at an organization focused on health, disability, gender and sexuality, or sexual violence.
Jenny’s poems and stories have appeared in august Australian and international literary journals and anthologies, as well as Asimov’s, Strange Horizons, Cosmos magazine, and multiple Rhysling anthologies. Her latest collection from Pitt Street Poetry is The Alpaca CantosEagle Books published her ghostly middle-grade adventure The Girl in the Mirror in October 2019. She is jennyblackford on Facebook and @dutiesofacat on Twitter. www.jennyblackford.com
Jeana Jorgensen earned her PhD in folklore at Indiana University. She has taught at universities around the Midwest as well as at the University of California, Berkeley. Her poetry has appeared in Stone Telling and Mirror Dance. She blogs at Patheos and is constantly on Twitter.
Rohinton Daruwala lives and works in Pune, India. He tweets as @wordbandar and blogs at https://wordbandar.wordpress.com/. His first collection of poems is The Sand Libraries of Timbuktu (Speaking Tiger 2016). His work has previously appeared in Strange Horizons, New Myths, Star*Line, Liminality, Through the Gate, and Silver Blade.
Current Issue
16 May 2022

we are whispered into this new land, this old land, whispered anew
i tuck myselves under coffin nails. and then i am the sun like a nairobi fly, burning spine and skin.
The last deer in heaven flees, and Sestu pursues.
Wednesday: The Anthropocene Unconscious: Climate Catastrophe Culture by Mark Bould 
Friday: Spear by Nicola Griffith 
Issue 9 May 2022
Podcast: 9 May Poetry 
Issue 2 May 2022
By: Eric Wang
By: Sara S. Messenger
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Podcast read by: Sara S. Messenger
Issue 18 Apr 2022
By: Blaize Kelly Strothers
By: Ken Haponek
Podcast read by: Blaize Kelly Strothers
Podcast read by: Ken Haponek
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Issue 11 Apr 2022
Issue 4 Apr 2022
Issue 28 Mar 2022
Issue 21 Mar 2022
By: Devin Miller
Art by: Alex Pernau
Podcast read by: Courtney Floyd
Issue 14 Mar 2022
Strange Horizons
Issue 7 Mar 2022
Strange Horizons
28 Feb 2022
We would like stories that are joyous, horrific, hopeful, despondent, powerful and subtle. Write something that will take our breath away, make us yell and cry. Write unapologetically in your local patois and basilects in space; make references to local events and memes to your heart’s content. Write something that makes you laugh and cry. Indulge in all the hallmarks of your heritage that you find yourself yearning for in speculative literature, but know that we will not judge you based on your authenticity as a Southeast Asian. 
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