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Direct link: April poetry (MP3)

In this episode of the Strange Horizons podcast, editor Anaea Lay presents poetry from the issues.

  • “The Ghosts of Occupation" by Wendy A. Howe, read by Wendy A. Howe. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Wendy here.
  • “1991, What I Wanted" by Boudreau Freret, read by Boudreau Freret. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Boudreau here.
  • “Her Sun-patterned Eye" by Alex Dally MacFarlane, read by Amal El-Mohtar. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Alex here.
  • “The God of Lost Things" by Neile Graham, read by Neile Graham. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Neile here.
  • “Transformations" by Kate Conover, read by Kate Conover. You can read the full text of the poem and more about Kate here.



Alex Dally MacFarlane is a writer, editor, and historian. Other historical stories can be read in the anthologies Steam-Powered 2: More Lesbian Steampunk Stories, Missing Links and Secret Histories, and Zombies: Shambling through the Ages. She is currently editing The Mammoth Book of SF Stories by Women, out late 2014.

Where it is not stated, translations from Ancient Greek are by Sonya Taaffe and translations from Arabic are by Sofia Samatar, used with their permissions, for which the author is deeply grateful.
Amal El-Mohtar is the Nebula-nominated author of The Honey Month, a collection of poetry and very short fiction written to the taste of twenty-eight different kinds of honey. She has thrice won the Rhysling Award for Best Short Poem and once received the 2012 Richard Jeffries Society Poetry Prize. Her short fiction has appeared in multiple venues online and in print, including Apex, Strange Horizons, Lackington's, and the special "Women Destroy Science Fiction" issue of Lightspeed magazine. She also edits Goblin Fruit, a web quarterly dedicated to fantastical poetry, with Caitlyn A. Paxson. She reviews books for Lightspeed and short fiction for Tor.com. Find her online at amalelmohtar.com or on Twitter @tithenai.
Boudreau Freret's satire has appeared in Yankee Pot Roast, The Talking Mirror, The Big Jewel, and on bathroom walls throughout Orleans Parish. His attempts to be serious have been featured in Six Sentences, Mylène Dressler's American Stories NOW, Metazen, and The Glass Coin. He likes root beer.
Kate Conover (cailin.liath@gmail.com) lives in Brooklyn, New York. Previous work appears in theNewerYork's EEEL.
Neile Graham's life is full of writing and writers. She is a graduate of Clarion West Writers Workshop and currently serves as their workshop director. Her poetry collections are Seven Robins, Spells for Clear Vision, and Blood Memory, and a spoken word CD, She Says: Poems Selected and New.
Wendy Howe is an English teacher who lives in California with her partner. She's fascinated by ghosts, myths, and ancient landscapes. Her work has been published in a variety of journals, including Goblin Fruit, Mythic Delirium, Jabberwocky, and Scheherezade's Bequest, along with several anthologies, including The Midnight Garden and Forgetting Home: Poems About Alzheimer's.
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