Size / / /

AJ Odasso's poetry, nonfiction, and short stories have appeared in an eclectic variety of magazines and anthologies since 2005. AJ’s début collection, Lost Books (Flipped Eye Publishing), was nominated for the 2010 London New Poetry Award and was also a finalist for the 2010/2011 People’s Book Prize. Their second collection with Flipped Eye, The Dishonesty of Dreams, was released in 2014.  Their third-collection manuscript, Things Being What They Are, an earlier version of The Sting of It, was shortlisted for the 2017 Sexton Prize.  The Sting of It was published by Tolsun Books and won Best LGBT Book in the 2019 New Mexico/Arizona Book Awards.  AJ holds an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Boston University.  They teach at Central New Mexico Community College and the University of New Mexico.  They have served in the Poetry Department at Strange Horizons magazine since 2012.

Romie is a filmmaker and closed captioner. Her poems have appeared in inkscrawl, Dreams&Nightmares, Polu Texni, and Liminality, but she is better known for her essays in The Toast and Atlas Obscura, and a microfiction project called postorbital. She has been a guest artist of the National Gallery (London), the Institute of Contemporary Art, and the Dallas Museum of Art. You can find her fairly complete bibliography here.

Sonya's short fiction and poetry can be found in the collections Ghost Signs (Aqueduct Press), A Mayse-Bikhl (Papaveria Press), Postcards from the Province of Hyphens (Prime Books), and Singing Innocence and Experience (Prime Books), and in various anthologies including The Humanity of Monsters, Genius Loci: Tales of the Spirit of Place, and Dreams from the Witch House: Female Voices of Lovecraftian Horror. She holds master's degrees in Classics from Brandeis and Yale and once named a Kuiper belt object. She lives in Somerville with her husband and two cats.


AJ Odasso, Romie Stott, and Sonya Taaffe in our archives
Current Issue
28 Nov 2022

The comb is kept in a small case and a magnifying glass is there for you
Know that the end / is something that you cannot escape here.
I wanted to ask francophone African speculative authors how they feel, how non-Black francophone African authors relate to the controversy, but also how they position themselves either as Afrofuturists or Africanfuturists, or as neither.
The new idea is to have the sixth sensors oversee the end of humanity.
By: RiverFlow
Translated by: Emily Jin
In conclusion, I argue that SF fanzines in China mostly played a transitional role. That is, when no professional platforms were available to publish articles and stories, fanzines stepped in. Though most of those fanzines did not last very long, they played the important role of compiling and delivering information. The key reason why I identify those magazines as fanzines is because all the contributors joined out of their interest in SF and worked for free.
Issue 21 Nov 2022
Issue 14 Nov 2022
Issue 7 Nov 2022
Issue 31 Oct 2022
Issue 17 Oct 2022
Issue 10 Oct 2022
Issue 3 Oct 2022
Issue 26 Sep 2022
Issue 21 Sep 2022
Issue 12 Sep 2022
Load More