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She said, i set my love out over an ocean of space
in a ship made of recycled parts, and
if i do and if i don’t miss his dear body
then is that a healthy love?

when you feel a face so close
that it starts to be one feature
in your hands that touch any body—
how do you know if it fits like a glove?

then, She said, you measure your pace,
keep time with quiet hands, not singing hearts.
You will know when: when no body
can shove you off balance—

then you’ve found the place,
thin as a blade with an edge that smarts,
where everybody can feel your face
like a crucial lever, like a restless dove.



Rasha is a queer Palestinian Southerner who grew up between Damascus, Syria and rural Georgia and cut their teeth organizing on the southsides of Atlanta and Chicago. They are a member of Alternate ROOTS, Southerners on New Ground, Justice for Muslims Healing Collective, and the Radius of Arab American Writers (RAWI). Rasha's work has appeared in Mizna, Room, Lambda Literary, and Strange Horizons, and is anthologized in Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia Butler and Halal if You Hear Me. As a community technologist, urban farmer, and once and future beekeeper, Rasha is a geek for science both fiction and fact. You can find them tweeting @rashaabdulhadi.
Current Issue
27 Jun 2022

A crack in my leg opened my world, shattered it like thunder announces the arrival of lightning
it's only natural that // If I'm going, I want to be gone with you.
Kalpavigyan: An Interview with Dip Ghosh 
Strange Horizons
Gautam Bhatia: Hi Dip, and thanks so much for agreeing to do this interview with Strange Horizons. I want to start by asking you something basic: the name of the Bengali SF magazine you edit is Kalpabiswa. Bengali SF itself is known as kalpavigyan. Can you take us through the etymology of these terms, and how we should understand them in translation?  Dip Ghosh: The first work of Bengali SF was written almost 190 years ago. However, the term kalpavigyan, and the umbrella definition of it, was coined by SF writer and pioneering editor Adrish Bardhan around 1975 for his
There are plenty of reasons to love epistolary storytelling. Personally, I love the way various epistolary formats can shape a story in interesting and innovative ways, and I also love how the choice of format can hone the voice of a story.
Friday: How to Get to Apocalypse and Other Disasters by Erica L. Satifka 
Issue 20 Jun 2022
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Drowning in This Sunken City 
Thursday: Everything Everywhere All At Once 
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Issue 6 Jun 2022
Podcast: 6 June Poetry 
Issue 30 May 2022
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Issue 16 May 2022
Issue 9 May 2022
Podcast: 9 May Poetry 
Issue 2 May 2022
By: Eric Wang
By: Sara S. Messenger
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
Podcast read by: Sara S. Messenger
Issue 18 Apr 2022
By: Blaize Kelly Strothers
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Podcast read by: Blaize Kelly Strothers
Podcast read by: Ken Haponek
Podcast read by: Ciro Faienza
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